C.R.E.AM.

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C.R.E.AM.

from 300.00

C.R.E.A.M

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A Raisin in the Sun is a play by Lorraine Hansberry that debuted on Broadway in 1959

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The story tells of a black family's experiences in the Washington Park Subdivision of Chicago's Woodlawn neighborhood as they attempt to "better" themselves with an insurance payout following the death of the father.

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A big part of one the character’s story is her hair- specifically whether to continue to straighten or “mutilate” it as another character puts it, or cut it and let it be natural. By cutting her hair, she makes a very bold statement about who she is.

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Why is it so bold? Well, from the turn of the century on, women of color were expected to straighten their hair using heated combs and various hair treatments. Mme C.J. Walker and G.A. Morgan popularized this technique.

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Women were happy to have a way to make their hair more manageable and as this ad from 1901 suggests, more like white women.

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For women of this time, straightening the hair was a good way to feel more attractive and to be more accepted by the cultural majority and the practice of assimilation was the way to do it.

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Around the time that the play was written, the idea that assimilation wasn’t the only way of creating success for ones self started to take hold.

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African Americans were starting to look to their roots figuratively and literally to get a sense of a true identity; not just one that one adopted from white culture.

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#February 

 

 

Print Sizes

(S): 8.5x11 in
(M) 24x36 in
(L) 30x40 in
(XL) 60x40 in

Printed on High Quality Archival Metallic Paper

Hand signed and numbered.

Ships within 14 days of purchase 

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